Links

In addition to our own website, there are other sites on the Web that provide interesting and helpful dental information.  Because we are committed to improving the oral healthcare knowledge of our patients, we are providing the following selection of links to other sites you might find interesting and informative also you can find post op instuctions for certain procedures. We have grouped some of the links into various categories to provide quick access to the topics of greatest interest to you.

If you have a suggestion for a new link, please send us an email, as we are always looking for good resources to pass along to our valued patients and visitors to our website.  We hope you find these sites helpful!


General Dental Websites

The following links provide some good general information on dentistry.

Academy of General Dentistry

The AGD’s consumer information section provides information on more than 50 oral dental health topics.

American Dental Association

Provides information for the general public including dental care articles, dental insurance information, and information for students interested in dentistry.

Floss.com

Contains a wide variety of dental health information, including articles on women's dental health issues, child dental care information, halitosis (bad breath) section, and new dental product information.

Glossary of Dental Terms

American Dental Association’s comprehensive reference provides a glossary of dental terms as they relate to the public.


Oral Health Care & Products

Links to sites providing helpful information on oral health and home care products patients can use to maintain optimum oral health.

Colgate

Trusted resource for dental health information and oral care products.

Crest

One of the world's most trusted brands in dental products.

Oral-B

Oral-B developed this learning center for dental health education to promote oral care habits that are essential to the lifelong health of teeth and gums.  The site includes information and advice for children, adults, and dental health teachers.

Sonicare

Learn how the Sonicare toothbrush creates an indescribable clean feeling, the benefits you can expect, and even take a factory tour.


Other Interesting Websites

Other sites of interest on the Web.

Healthy Smiles 2010

A program with a goal to combat America’s Oral Health Epidemic by improving the oral health of more than 50 million American children and their families by the year 2010.

National Museum of Dentistry

The museum, a Smithsonian Institution Affiliate, is a lively national center
where visitors learn the importance of a healthy smile and are fascinated
by the rich history of dentistry.


Post-OP & Home Care Instructions

Post-op instructions for SRP, Extractions, Crowns, Partials & Complete Dentures.

PATIENT INSTRUCTIONS FOLLOWING SCALING AND ROOT PLANING

 Approximately 5 days following scaling and root planing, you can expect to experience less bleeding and less swelling of your gum tissue.  Your mouth will taste and feel better.  Your gum health can then be maintained with proper brushing, flossing, and routine dental cleaning professionally.

 DISCOMFORT

Should subside in a few hours; definitely within a few days.  Discomfort immediately after treatment is usually associated with slight throbbing or aching. If a local anesthetic was used avoid chewing foods until feeling returns to avoid injury to the tongue or cheeks.  Over the counter Ibuprofen or Tylenol should be taken to reduce discomfort.  If tooth sensitivity persists, use a desensitizing toothpaste containing potassium nitrate.  If the sensitivity is severe and prolonged, professional application of a desensitizing agent may be required.

 TOOTH SENSITIVITY

Teeth may be sensitive to temperature changes and/or sweets.  Sensitivity to temperature may be noticeable the first several days and usually diminishes quickly.  Application of a desensitizing fluoride may be recommended.

 BLEEDING

Some slight bleeding may occur when brushing, but should steadily decrease as your gum tissue becomes healthier.

 APPEARANCE

As the gums heal they may change their shape around the teeth, this is normal as they tighten.

 ORAL HYGIENE

If gum tissues are tender, brush your teeth gently but thoroughly; this may take a little more time than normal.  By the third or fourth day, normal oral hygiene techniques may be resumed.  Mouth rinsing is recommended with either of the following solutions: 1) Chlorhexidine Gluconate, 2) a warm salt-water rinse.

 SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS

If symptoms are severe or persistent, please call our office immediately. If after hours please call 404.805.1454 cell

Extraction Post-op Instructions

 

A. Wound Care

1. Bite firmly for 30 minutes on the gauze pack that has been placed, if the   area          

    still bleeding when gauze is removed, place sufficient new, damp gauze so that

    pressure is applied to the site and teeth are not contacting.

2. Do not smoke for 24 hours because this will promote bleeding and interfere                                            

    with healing.

B. Bleeding

               1. Do not spit or suck through a straw, since this promotes bleeding

               2. If bleeding is more than slight then place a tea bag dipped in warm water over the

                wound and bite down to exert pressure for 30 minutes.

C. Discomfort

               1. Take over the counter Ibuprofen (Motrin), Tylenol or prescribed medication as

                   directed.  This is essential because it is easier to keep pain from starting than to

                   attempt to stop pain once it starts.

               2. If an antibiotic is prescribed, take it until it is gone.  If you have an adverse or

                  allergic reaction to the medication (such as itching or hives) stop taking it and

                  contact us immediately.  If you experience nausea then take medication with food.

               3. Do not drink alcohol with prescription medication and avoid strenuous activity

                   for 12 hours after surgery.

D. Swelling

               1. Swelling after tooth removal is a normal body reaction and reaches its maximum

                   about 48 hours after surgery.  Apply ice pacts over the area for the first 12 hours,

                   this helps control swelling- 15 minutes on then 15 minutes off

E. Diet

               1. Drink lots of fluids, avoid carbonated drinks for 48 hours

               2. Eat soft foods for 48 hour

Crown & Bridge Post-op Instructions

 

1.   After the final cementation of your fixed restoration, it may take a few days to get used to the new crown or bridge.

2.   If you feel the bite is not correctly balanced, be sure and call for an appointment for a simple adjustment.

3.  You may have sensitivity to cold. Avoid cold food and drinks, if this is a problem. Sensitivity should subside in a few days to a few weeks.

4.  You may have gum irritation after the crown is placed. Warm salt water rinses (1 tsp. salt in 1 cup warm water) for the  next few days will help the gum to heal and will help relieve discomfort. You may experience some bleeding of the gum when brushing and flossing for the first few times.  Continue brushing and flossing all the teeth as usual and these symptoms should subside in a few days.

5.   Proper brushing and flossing is recommended to help you retain your final restoration. The crowned tooth can decay at the edge of the crown at the gumline.  Treat and care for your crown as you would for all of your teeth.

6.  Follow all our home care instructions exactly as directed. Always use a fluoridated toothpaste. Success of treatment depends directly on the improvement/maintenance of your excellent oral hygiene.

7.   If you have any question or problem, call us at 770.593.2202.

 

 

 CARE INSTRUCTIONS FOR YOUR FLEXIBLE PARTIAL 

-Flexible partial dentures are different from the older style of acrylic partials.  They are made of a thermoplastic vinyl resin that allows for improved esthetics and patient comfort.  Because they are made of a different material from acrylic partials, the care instructions are different as well.

-A flexible partial should be soaked overnight at least 3 nights a week in TCS cleaner or Val-Clean denture cleaner daily for about 10-15 minutes and rinsed with water before putting in mouth. If TCS or Val-Clean is not readily available, Stain-Away is available at Walgreens. 

-Do not use a brush to clean the appliance. Over time brushing dulls the shine and roughens the surface; also don’t use effervescing cleaners or cleaners containing peroxide or bleach.

-Clean your flexible partial appliance regularly.

-If possible, rinse your dental appliance after eating to remove any food particles.

-Keep the denture in water or in denture cleaner whenever it is not being worn to keep the surface hydrated.

-Remember to brush your natural teeth and gums regularly as directed by your dentist.

-Bring your partial dentures to all regular cleaning appointments.

-An at-home ultrasonic denture cleaner is the very best way to keep your flexible partial looking and feeling new and clean.  They are readily available at Wal-Mart, Amazon.com, and many other stores online. 

Please call our office if you have any questions regarding your flexible partial dentures.

 

PARTIAL DENTURE CARE INSTRUCTIONS 

The care and cleaning of dentures are important to the health of the oral tissues and the lifespan of the dental prosthetics.Dentures MUST be left out at night; if not, underlying tissues become more prone to yeast infections, and shrinkage of the ridges may occur more rapidly, causing the dentures to need refitting or remaking more often.

Cleaning

A soft nylon brush, made for natural teeth, should be used to brush the tissues under the dentures and all other oral tissues daily. Holding the bristles under running hot tap water will soften them and make them more comfortable, no paste is needed. Besides brushing your ridges and roof of your mouth, it is also good to brush the top of your tongue and the inside of your cheeks.

  • A stiff denture brush and toothpaste made for dentures should be used for brushing the dentures a minimum of two times per day – never miss at bedtime and after all meals is ideal.
  • If tartar (calculus) builds up on the denture, it can be removed by soaking the denture overnight in pure WHITE vinegar. Brush the denture again in the morning and rinse thoroughly before reinserting. It may take more than one night of soaking to remove all the calculus.
  • During sleep, dentures must be left out, brushed and rinsed, stored in a denture bath of water.  Daily or weekly also soak in denture cleanser (Efferdent, Polident or any over the counter brand-usually a tablet that dissolves in water)

 Eating

Eat soft foods that are high in nutritive value until all sores are relieved and healed (1-3 weeks).

  • Consider taking a daily multiple vitamin.
  •  Do NOT try difficult foods like apples or steak during the break-in period. Even after the break-in period, these difficult foods should be cut into small pieces before chewing. Let your fork and knife do much of the chewing for you.
  • Individuals with dentures are more prone to choking than those with natural teeth, so be careful. Do not speak and eat at the same time.
 
  • Chew your food well before attempting to swallow. Remember, it is perfectly normal for you not to be able to eat as well with your new dentures as you had been before, because it takes a lot of adapting for your tongue to get used to the new dentures and for your tongue and lips and cheeks to learn to balance the dentures in place.

 Speech

Speaking with the new dentures may be more difficult for up to a few weeks, until your tongue adjusts to the new contour of your palate and lower jaw. It is common to whistle slightly on some sounds, especially “S” sounds; and also common to slur some words during this break-in period. Be patient and the adjustments will become automatic. If speech problems persist, many patients find it helpful to read out loud in front of a mirror, and to consciously try to adjust the sounds that do not sound normal to them. By practicing, the correction will be automatic.

Realistic Expectations

Complete dentures can only generate 20% masticatory forces (biting forces) at best; so it will take you about 5 chewing strokes to chew as well as one stroke when you had your own natural teeth.

 

DENTURE CARE INSTRUCTIONS 

The care and cleaning of dentures are important to the health of the oral tissues and the lifespan of the dental prosthetics.

Dentures MUST be left out at night; if not, underlying tissues become more prone to yeast infections, and shrinkage of the ridges may occur more rapidly, causing the dentures to need refitting or remaking more often.

Cleaning

A soft nylon brush, made for natural teeth, should be used to brush the tissues under the dentures and all other oral tissues daily. Holding the bristles under running hot tap water will soften them and make them more comfortable, no paste is needed. Besides brushing your ridges and roof of your mouth, it is also good to brush the top of your tongue and the inside of your cheeks.

  • A stiff denture brush and toothpaste made for dentures should be used for brushing the dentures a minimum of two times per day – never miss at bedtime and after all meals is ideal.
  • If tartar (calculus) builds up on the denture, it can be removed by soaking the denture overnight in pure WHITE vinegar. Brush the denture again in the morning and rinse thoroughly before reinserting. It may take more than one night of soaking to remove all the calculus.
  • During sleep, dentures must be left out, brushed and rinsed, stored in a denture bath of water.  Daily or weekly also soak in denture cleanser (Efferdent, Polident or any over the counter brand-usually a tablet that dissolves in water)

Eating

Eat soft foods that are high in nutritive value until all sores are relieved and healed (1-3 weeks).

  • Consider taking a daily multiple vitamin.
  • Do NOT try difficult foods like apples or steak during the break-in period. Even after the break-in period, these difficult foods should be cut into small pieces before chewing. Let your fork and knife do much of the chewing for you.
  • Individuals with dentures are more prone to choking than those with natural teeth, so be careful. Do not speak and eat at the same time.
  • Chew your food well before attempting to swallow. Remember, it is perfectly normal for you not to be able to eat as well with your new dentures as you had been before, because it takes a lot of adapting for your tongue to get used to the new dentures and for your tongue and lips and cheeks to learn to balance the dentures in place.

 Speech

Speaking with the new dentures may be more difficult for up to a few weeks, until your tongue adjusts to the new contour of your palate and lower jaw. It is common to whistle slightly on some sounds, especially “S” sounds; and also common to slur some words during this break-in period. Be patient and the adjustments will become automatic. If speech problems persist, many patients find it helpful to read out loud in front of a mirror, and to consciously try to adjust the sounds that do not sound normal to them. By practicing, the correction will be automatic.

 Realistic Expectations

Complete dentures can only generate 20% masticatory forces (biting forces) at best; so it will take you about 5 chewing strokes to chew as well as one stroke when you had your own natural teeth.

Fit

Usually the complete


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